Photo 28 Apr
Photo 28 Apr
Text 17 Feb 11 notes Rob Gronkowski is Hot and Naked on ESPN Body Issue 2012
Photo 11 Dec 8,726 notes fatboydiet:

itsdickandwallyairingsomeday:

littlemissbuzzybuzz:

Livin’ the dream.

who in the everloving puts mushrooms, olives, and broccoli on their pizza with no cheese?

I want one of these…

fatboydiet:

itsdickandwallyairingsomeday:

littlemissbuzzybuzz:

Livin’ the dream.

who in the everloving puts mushrooms, olives, and broccoli on their pizza with no cheese?

I want one of these…

(Source: fuckyeahsexanddrugs)

Link 21 Nov Only College Student Staying On Campus Planning Saddest Thanksgiving Meal Of All Time»
Photo 5 Nov
Photo 1 Nov 20,511 notes

(Source: winniestratford)

via FOXY POXY.
Photo 22 Oct 395 notes kqedscience:

World’s Skinniest House Actually Gets Built, Opens
via NPR.
Audio 28 Sep 48 notes

iwanttosleepnexttoyou:

I hope 22 seconds is long enough ;)

Played 2,675 times. via HotPositions.
Photo 15 Aug 305 notes theatlantic:

‘Beam Us Up, Mr. Scott!’: Why Misquotations Catch On

Have you noticed how incorrect quotes often just sound right—sometimes, more right than actual quotations? There’s a reason for that. Our brains really like fluency, or the experience of cognitive ease (as opposed to cognitive strain) in taking in and retrieving information. The more fluent the experience of reading a quote—or the easier it is to grasp, the smoother it sounds, the more readily it comes to mind—the less likely we are to question the actual quotation. Those right-sounding misquotes are just taking that tendency to the next step: cleaning up, so to speak, quotations so that they are more mellifluous, more all-around quotable, easier to store and recall at a later point. We might not even be misquoting on purpose, but once we do, the result tends to be catchier than the original.

Read more. [Image: Warner Bros.]

theatlantic:

‘Beam Us Up, Mr. Scott!’: Why Misquotations Catch On

Have you noticed how incorrect quotes often just sound right—sometimes, more right than actual quotations? There’s a reason for that. Our brains really like fluency, or the experience of cognitive ease (as opposed to cognitive strain) in taking in and retrieving information. The more fluent the experience of reading a quote—or the easier it is to grasp, the smoother it sounds, the more readily it comes to mind—the less likely we are to question the actual quotation. Those right-sounding misquotes are just taking that tendency to the next step: cleaning up, so to speak, quotations so that they are more mellifluous, more all-around quotable, easier to store and recall at a later point. We might not even be misquoting on purpose, but once we do, the result tends to be catchier than the original.

Read more. [Image: Warner Bros.]

via NPR.

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